Jump to content


Photo

Bill will protect victims of MS and HIV from bias


  • This topic is locked This topic is locked
No replies to this topic

#1 Admin

Admin

    Administrator

  • Admin
  • 3,347 posts
  • Gender:Female

Posted 04 December 2003 - 10:08 PM

Thursday 4 December, 2003

The following is of major concern to all those affected by lupus. Why is SLE not included in this legislation and where are the lupus charities and the House of Commons Select Committee of MPs who are supposed to be representing and expressing concern for the 40,000+ sufferers in the UK?

PLEASE GO AND VOTE IN THE PUBLICITY & FUNDRAISING FORUM.

WRITE A LETTER TO YOUR MP AND DEMAND THAT S/HE ASKS WHY SLE IS NOT INCLUDED IN THIS BILL!

WRITE TO JANET DEAN MP OF THE HOUSE OF COMMONS SELECT COMMITTEE FOR LUPUS.

MS is a close relation to SLE. Indeed, a leading Consultant in lupus has stated that in his opinion, lupus is a neurological condition in which the body's organs may be affected. In MS the immune system only attacks the myelin shealth but in SLE, any body system can be attacked, including the myelin sheath.
On that basis, SLE should be included.

WE often feel helpless in the face of our disease. However, we have a choice whether to take responsibility and fight for what we need and deserve. If we do not chose to be responsible for ourselves, we cannot blame others for failing!

Admin


Thursday 4 December 2003

Bill will protect victims of MS and HIV from bias

PEOPLE suffering from multiple sclerosis, HIV and most forms of cancer would be granted statutory protection against discrimination because of their condition under draft legislation published by the Government yesterday.

At present, protection is granted only once the symptoms of the degenerative conditions become clearly visible.

The Department for Work and Pensions estimates that an extra 73,000 people will be covered by extending it to the time of diagnosis.

A draft Disability Discrimination Bill proposes that people with such conditions could take legal action if, for example, their employer discriminated against them or they were refused service in a shop because of their illness.

The Government had previously indicated that HIV and cancer patients would benefit from legislation, but announced yesterday that MS had been added following consultation with those affected.

Mike O'Donovan, the chief executive of the MS Society, welcomed the Government's decision to extend the provisions to include everyone with MS from the point of diagnosis.

"MS is a progressive and fluctuating disease, with serious symptoms that can come and go and are not always visible," said Mr O'Donovan.

Other provisions in the draft Bill will give all public bodies a positive duty to promote equality of opportunity for the disabled in the same way that they are already required to for people of different races.

The change requires public bodies to consider the needs of the disabled at the earliest stages of planning for all new projects.

Bert Massie, the chairman of the Disability Rights Commission, said the proposals would have a "seismic" impact on many people's lives.

Transport operators would be required to provide disabled people access to buses and trains where "reasonable".

Andrew Smith, the Work and Pensions Secretary, said it was "landmark legislation to serve the civil rights of disabled people, driving out discrimination and bringing practical benefits to disabled people and the whole community".

He added: "Taken with other measures the Government has brought in, it transforms the landscape of disability rights compared to 1997."

The draft Bill will be subject to pre-legislative scrutiny by a cross-party parliamentary committee during this session. The Government says it is committed to making it law by the end of the Parliament, expected in 2005.

Paul Goodman, the Tory spokesman for disability, said publishing the Bill in draft form was a missed opportunity. "People with disabilities and groups representing carers will be disappointed by this continued delay and will feel let down."

Copyright 2003 The Daily Telegraph. Source: Financial Times Information
Limited - Europe Intelligence Wire

The documents contained in this web site
are presented for information purposes only. The material is in no way
intended to replace professional medical care or attention by a qualified
practitioner. The materials in this web site cannot and should not be used as
a basis for diagnosis or choice of treatment.

Copyright 1998-2003 NetDoctor.co.uk All rights reserved NetDoctor.co.uk is a
trademark

Edited by Admin, 09 December 2003 - 09:11 PM.





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users