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      Winter vaccinations!   11/03/2016

      It is very important for people with chronic diseases, such as SLE,and for those people taking corticosteroids and immunosuppressants, including chemotherapy drugs, should go to their doctor to be immunised against flu. Flu is not a bad cold! It can be dangerous. Apart from the annual flu jab, ask your doctor about the pneumovax vaccine which will help prevent serious problems with the lungs. Those with asthma should also ask about the various kinds of vaccines available. Finally, Herpes Zoster infections can lead to the risk of strokes in certain populations which include, rheumatoid arthritis and SLE. There is a new post with information, along with a video. Be well! Ros
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      When you Sign Up,  Please use the following to complete the Date of Birth entry: nn-nn-nnnn where n=number. Thus, if your birthday is 5th May 1968, enter: 05-05-1968. Use the “-“ separator and not the “/“.                                                
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      GHIC   09/08/2017

      I am excited to announce that LUpus Patients Understanding & Support (LUPUS) is linking with The Graham Hughes International Charity (GHIC). This means I will be posting articles from Professor Hughes here. About 25% of those with SLE also have Hughes Syndrome. As more research is being done, its findings are extremely important for those who have this condition. Like SLE, diagnosis can take a very long time.

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  1. Researchers identify new genetic markers in patients with lupus Langefeld CD, et al. Nat Commun. 2017;doi:10.1038/ncomms16021. July 21, 2017 Among patients with lupus, researchers have identified new genetic markers that predispose patients to the disease, according to a recently published study. “This study is the largest multi-ethnic lupus genetics study to date and allowed us to identify many new genetic markers, some of which are specific to individual ethnic groups and others that are shared across ethnicities,” Carl Langefeld, PhD, lead author of the study and professor of biostatistical sciences at Wake Forest School of Medicine, said in a press release. “With this information, we can begin to better understand the differences in the rates and severity of disease across ethnic groups.” Researchers assessed 27,574 participants. They identified 58 distinct non-human leukocyte antigen regions in the Europeans, nine in the Africans and 16 in the Hispanic Americans. All of these included 24 new lupus regions. “In addition, we observed that many of the genetic markers associated with lupus are shared across numerous autoimmune diseases, and those that are not shared may allow us to understand why a person develops lupus instead of another autoimmune disease,” Langefeld said. “These results will help us identify the biological pathways that pharmaceutical companies may target, and ultimately, develop personalized medicine for the treatment of lupus.” Reference: www.wakehealth.edu/News-Releases/2017/Large_Multiethnic_Study_Identifies_Many_New_Genetic_Markers_for_Lupus.htm Large Multi-ethnic Study Identifies Many New Genetic Markers for Lupus WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. – July 17, 2017 – Scientists from an international consortium have identified a large number of new genetic markers that predispose individuals to lupus. The study is published in the July 17 issue of the journal Nature Communications and was led by researchers at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation, King’s College of London and Genentech Inc. Autoimmune diseases strike one in 15 Americans, are among the top 10 causes of death in women and cost an estimated $100 billion a year in medical care. In autoimmune diseases, the body attacks itself. Systemic lupus erythematosus, the form of lupus studied here, is the most common type of lupus and is a prototypical autoimmune disease. Lupus strikes women nine times more often than men and its onset is most common during childbearing age. Also, African-American and Hispanic women are two to three times more likely to develop lupus and tend to have more severe cases than Caucasian women. At present, there is no cure for lupus, which can affect many parts of the body, including joints, skin, kidney, heart, lungs, blood vessels and brain, according to the Lupus Research Alliance. “This study is the largest multi-ethnic lupus genetics study to date and allowed us to identify many new genetic markers, some of which are specific to individual ethnic groups and others that are shared across ethnicities,” said Carl Langefeld, Ph.D., lead author of the study and professor of biostatistical sciences at Wake Forest School of Medicine, a part of Wake Forest Baptist. “With this information, we can begin to better understand the differences in the rates and severity of disease across ethnic groups. “In addition, we observed that many of the genetic markers associated with lupus are shared across numerous autoimmune diseases, and those that are not shared may allow us to understand why a person develops lupus instead of another autoimmune disease. These results will help us identify the biological pathways that pharmaceutical companies may target, and ultimately, develop personalized medicine for the treatment of lupus.” This study analyzed genetic data from 27,574 individuals of European, African American and Hispanic ancestry using the Immunochip, a genotyping technology designed specifically for autoimmune diseases. The researchers identified 58 regions of the genome in Caucasians, nine in African Americans and 16 in Hispanics. These regions appear independent of the well-known Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) associations, also studied in depth here. An important observation was that nearly 50 percent of these regions had multiple genetic variants that predispose someone to lupus, Langefeld said. Another key finding was that as the number of genetic risk variants (alleles) a person has increases, the risk for lupus increases more than expected if the variants were working independently. These observations led the authors to propose a “cumulative hits hypothesis for autoimmune disease”. In future research, the team hopes to better understand how these genetic variants influence the risk of lupus, identify any possible drug targets and determine if any environmental factors, such as infections, can trigger the development of the disease in someone who has a genetic susceptibility. They emphasize that it is important to increase the number of understudied populations, such as African-American and Hispanic, to better understand the genetic causes of health disparities in lupus and the unique risks in all ethnic groups. “We are delighted to see the work we funded on the ImmunoChip come to fruition and congratulate Dr. Langefeld along with his colleagues on this tremendous success," said Kenneth M. Farber, CEO and President, Lupus Research Alliance. "This study is among the few to concentrate heavily on non-Caucasian populations for a significantly broader evaluation, while utilizing the most current and comprehensive information about human DNA.” Key support for the study was provided by the Lupus Research Alliance and the National Institutes of Health. Additional corresponding authors are: Patrick M. Gaffney, M.D., Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation; Robert R. Graham, Ph.D., Genentech, Inc.; and Timothy J. Vyse, M.D., Ph.D., King’s College London. Media Relations Contacts: Marguerite Beck: marbeck@wakehealth.edu,336-716-2415
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