Jump to content

Unread Forum Topics

Showing all content posted in for the last 365 days.

This stream auto-updates     

  1. Earlier
  2. Dietary Supplements and Homeopathy Are Not Tested for Safety and Effectiveness Posted by Kathleen Hoffman on Dec 17, 2018 in Blog | 0 comments On October 30, 2018, the FDA sent a letter to the American Botanical Pharmacy and “Dr.” Richard Schulze – whose “doctorate is in herbology”- stating, Yet on December 8, 2018, the website still had this question and answer posted. Type I diabetes is an autoimmune condition in which the body destroys the beta cells of the pancreas that produce insulin. Lifestyle changes and using supplements will not cure Type I diabetes. Although the company removed items from the FDA’s detailed list of violations, they still missed this and several other claims of cures with the use of their dietary supplement products. Use of Supplements and Homeopathy More than half of the US adult population consume dietary supplements. The dietary supplement industry today is a $35.9 billion a year market and is estimated to grow by 20 billion dollars in the next six years.3 Around six million people in the US use homeopathy, one million of them are children. Unfortunately, many people do not realize that these products are regulated as food. The Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act, passed in 1994, allows these products to be sold without testing for safety or effectiveness and without information on adverse effects or packaging that is child-resistant.4 Distrust of the pharmaceutical industry and an interest in taking control of one’s health are just a couple of the reasons people choose dietary supplements and homeopathy. Unfortunately, dietary supplements and homeopathy are being actively promoted on the Internet in lieu of regulated, mainstream treatments. Many of these supplements have serious drawbacks. Recent research found that 746 dietary supplement brands from between 2007 and 2016 contained active pharmaceutical drugs, like steroids.5 Teething tablets by Hyland’s Homeopathic were recently discovered to contained belladonna nightshade, a poisonous plant. Linked to deaths of babies last year, the FDA warned consumers not to use these products.6 Hepatotoxicity is a principle safety issue for as many as 60 herbal supplements. Green tea contains ECGC, an antioxidant that is toxic for liver cells. Green tea based herbal supplements containing other ingredients have been implicated in liver damage requiring liver transplant.7 It shouldn’t be surprising to learn that a 2015 study of emergency room visits in the US estimated that over 23,000 emergency department visits per year can be attributed to adverse events caused by dietary supplements. These visits resulted in an estimated 2,154 hospitalizations.8 It’s important to be careful and wary of what is advertised as supplements. Remembering that the FDA does not test these products for safety or effectiveness before they are sold to you. It is only when a problem arises and the FDA is notified, that warnings and recalls occur. Check out Meat Packers and Patent Medicines: Welcome to Life before the FDA References 1 https://www.fda.gov/ICECI/EnforcementActions/WarningLetters/ucm627164.htm 2 https://www.herbdoc.com/blog/is-diabetes-curablec.oup.com/jnci/article/110/1/121/4064136 3 https://www.statista.com/statistics/828481/total-dietary-supplements-market-size-in-the-us/ 4 https://ods.od.nih.gov/About/DSHEA_Wording.aspx 5 doi:10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2018.3337 6 https://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/ConsumerUpdates/ucm230762.htm 7 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpeds.2018.05.022 8 DOI: 10.1056/NEJMsa1504267 https://medivizor.com/blog/2018/12/17/dietary-supplements-and-homeopathy/?utm_campaign=website&utm_source=sendgrid.com&utm_medium=email
  3. Cannabinoids for RA: What Rheumatologists Need to Know Linda Peckel Nov 12, 2018 Studies indicate the benefits of treatment with cannabinoids for rheumatic diseases in general.1-3 In rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the target of cannabinoid therapy has been pain reduction. Clinical data do not currently support an indication for reduction of disease severity, although new studies continue to explore this potential. References: 1. Katz-Talmor D, Katz I, Porat-Katz BS, Shoenfeld Y. Cannabinoids for the treatment of rheumatic diseases - where do we stand? Nat Rev Rheumatol. 2018 Jun 8. doi: 10.1038/s41584-018-0025-5. [Epub ahead of print] 2. Gui H, Tong Q, Qu W, Mao CM, Dai SM. The endocannabinoid system and its therapeutic implications in rheumatoid arthritis. Int Immunopharmacol. 2015;26:86-91. 3. Richards BL, Whittle SL, Buchbinder R. Neuromodulators for pain management in rheumatoid arthritis (review). Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2012;1:CD008921. http://www.rheumatologynetwork.com/arthritis/cannabinoids-ra-what-rheumatologists-need-know?rememberme=1&elq_mid=4976&elq_cid=1830808
  4. Admin

    GDPR

    Your GDPR questions answered Individual Rights The right to be informed Invision Community has a built in privacy policy system that is presented to a new user, and existing users when it has been updated. What should your privacy policy contain? I personally like the look of SEQ Legal's framework which is available for free. This policy covers the important points such as which cookies are collected, how personal information is used and so on. There may be other services out there offering similar templates. Right to erasure I personally feel that everyone should listen to "A Little Respect" as it's not only a cracking tune, but also carries a wonderful message. The GDPR document however relates to the individuals right to be forgotten. Invision Community allows you to delete members. When deleting members, you can elect to remove their content too. There is an option to keep it as Guest content, thus removing the author as identifiable. It's worth using the 'keep' option after researching the user's posts to make sure they haven't posted personal information such as where they live, etc. Emailing and Consent Invision Community has the correct opt-in for bulk emails on registration that is not pre-checked. If the user checks this option, this is recorded with the member's history. Likewise, if they retract this permission, that action is also recorded. When you edit the terms and conditions or privacy policy, all users are required to read it again and opt-in again. Cookies A lot of GDPR anxiety seems to revolve around these tiny little text files your browser stores. If you read the GDPR document (and who doesn't love a little light reading) then you'll see that very little has actually changed with cookies. It extends current data protection guidance a little to ensure that you are transparent about which cookies you store. Invision Community has tools to create a floating cookie opt-in bar, and also a page showing which cookies are stored and why. This is the page that you'd edit to add any cookies your installation sets (if you have enabled Facebook's Pixel, or Google Analytics for example). Your GDPR Questions Now let's look at some questions that have been asked on our community and I'll do my best to provide some guidance that should help you make decisions on how to configure your Invision Community to suit your needs. Alan!! Is the soft opt-in cookie policy enough? What about the IP address stored in the session cookie? Great question. There's conflicting advise out there about this. The GDPR document states: The ICO states that session cookies stored for that session only (so they are deleted when the tab / window is closed) are OK as long as they are not used to profile users. This is re-enforced by EUROPA: My feeling is that GDPR isn't really out to stop you creating a functioning website, they are more interested in how you store and use this information. Thus, I feel that storing a session cookie with an IP address is OK. The user is told what is being stored and instructions are given if they want to delete them. Given the internet is very much driven by IP addresses, I fail to see how you can not collect an IP address in some form or another. They are collected in access logs deep in the server OS. Finally, there is a strong legitimate interest in creating a session cookie. It's part and parcel of the website's function and the cookie is not used in any 'bad' way. It just allows guests and members to retain preferences and update "last seen" times to help deliver content. Do I need to delete all the posts by a member if they ask me to? We have many large clients in the EU with really impressive and expensive legal teams and they are all unanimous in telling us that there is no requirement to delete content when deleting a user's personal information. The analogy often given is with email: once someone sends you an email you are not obligated to delete that. The same is true with content posted by a user: once they post that content it's no longer "owned" by them and is now out in public. Ultimately, the decision is yours but do not feel that you have to delete their content. This is not a GDPR requirement. What about members who haven't validated? They're technically not members but we're still holding their data! No problem. The system does delete un-validated users and incomplete users automatically for you. You can even set the time delay for deletion in the ACP. What about RECAPTCHA? I use this, and it technically collects some data! Just add that you use this service to your privacy policy, like so: I see many companies emailing out asking for members to opt back in for bulk mail, do I need to do this? Short answer: No. Since Invision Community 4.0, you can only ever bulk email users that have opted in for bulk emails. There's no way around it, so there's nothing to ask them to opt-in for. They've already done it. There is a tiny wrinkle in that pre 4.2.7, the opt-in was pre-checked as was the norm for most websites. Moving forward, GDPR asks for explicit consent, so this checkbox cannot be pre-ticked (and isn't in Invision Community 4.2.7 and later). However, the ICO is clear that if the email list has a legitimate interest, and was obtained with soft opt-in, then you don't need to ask again for permission. What about notifications? They send emails! Yes they do, but that's OK. A notification is only ever sent after a user chooses to follow an item. This falls under legitimate interest. There is also a clear way to stop receiving emails. The user can opt-in and opt-out of email as a notification device at their leisure. Do I need to stop blocking embeds and external images? No. The internet is based on cross-linking of things and sharing information. At a very fundamental level, it's going to be incredibly hard to prevent it from happening. Removing these engaging and enriching tools are only going to make your community suffer. There's no harm in adding a few lines in your privacy policy explaining that the site may feature videos from Vimeo and Youtube as part of user contributions but you do not need to be worried. As stated earlier, GDPR isn't about sucking the fun out of the internet, it's about being responsible and transparent. Phew. Hopefully you've got a better understanding about how Invision Community can assist your GDPR compliance efforts. The best bit of advice is to not panic. If you have any questions, we'd love to hear them. Drop us a line below. Edited May 12 by Matt GDPR updates for Invision Community 4.3.3 Unless you've been living under a rock, or forgot to opt-in to the memo, GDPR is just around the corner. Last week we wrote a blog answering your questions on becoming GDPR compliant with Invision Community. We took away a few good points from that discussion and have the following updates coming up for Invision Community 4.3.3 due early next week. Downloading Personal Data Invision Community already has a method of downloading member data via the member export feature that produces a CSV. However, we wanted Invision Community to be more helpful, so we've added a feature that downloads personal data (such as name, email address, known IP addresses, known devices, opt in details and customer data from Nexus if you're using that) in a handy XML format which is very portable and machine readable. You can access this feature via the ACP member view The download itself is in a standard XML format. A sample export Pruning IP Addresses While there is much debate about whether IP addresses are personal information or not, a good number of our customers requested a way to remove IP addresses from older content. There are legitimate reasons to store IP addresses for purchase transactions (so fraud can be detected), for security logs (to prevent hackers gaining access) and to prevent spammers registering. However, under the bullet point of not storing information for longer than is required, we have added this feature to remove IP addresses from posted content (reviews, comments, posts, personal messages, etc) after a threshold. The default is 'Never', so don't worry. Post upgrade you won't see IP addresses removed unless you enter a value. This new setting is under Posting Deleting Members Invision Community has always had a way to delete a member and retain their content under a "Guest" name. We've cleaned this up in 4.3.3. When you delete a member, but want to retain their content, you are offered an option to anonymise this. Choosing this option attributes all posted content to 'Guest' and removes any stored IP addresses. Deleting a member Privacy Policy We've added a neat little feature to automatically list third parties you use on your privacy policy. If you enable Google Analytics, or Facebook Pixel, etc, these are added for you. The new setting Finding Settings Easily To make life a little easier, we've added "GDPR" as a live search keyword for the ACP. Simply tap that into the large search bar and Invision Community will list the relevant settings you may want to change. These changes show our ongoing commitment to helping you with your GDPR compliance. We'll be watching how GDPR in practise unfolds next month and will continue to adapt where required.
  5. Admin

    Today is World Lupus Day!

    Today, is World Lupus Day! Join Us and tell your story!
  6. Admin

    Tabbles

    I have been using Tabbles since it started and seen how it has developed. Its developer, Andrea, is someone who takes customer support very seriously. Whenever I have had a query or report a bug, he responds quickly. In addition, he has been very generous and has donated Tabbles to help me in my research. I am an academic researcher, which means reading hundreds of articles for a project. It's easy to create a new project, or container/virtual folder for the project, but each article may have aspects which can be tagged separately. For example, I am beginning a new project on contemporary racism. I created a new Tabble called Racism, which I colour coded - just as I used to do when I used cards for my research at university. I have hundreds of articles, from other projects, which are suitable for this project. It's easy to drop these into this new Tabble, from completed projects. At the same time, I can tag them to remind me they were also part of another Tabble or project. Many of the articles or information can be combined & Tabbles allows me to view these by using the "plus" sign.Thus,I can open the Racism Tabble & open two or more files at the same time. This "combine" feature means I can group together certain articles. For example, I might have a folder, within the Racism Tabble, called 19th century. Within this, I might want to put certain articles relating to 19th century. I can open & "combine" this specific information, from the articles, on nationalism in Germany. I might have a paper that I recall is a PDF & I can click on "New extension-tabble" because Tabbles automatically notes the extension of the file and locate the PDF. As I use the web for my research, Tabbles has a feature for the browser. I predominantly use Chrome and this means I can tag these articles for future reference. Every time I save an article, Tabbles lets me "tag" it via a pop-up my desktop.I can even create another Tabble or virtual folder, if necessary. As I research on the web, I can also use Tabbles to store its contents via tagging. One of the best features is to tag a file/article based, for example, on its "name". For this, Tabbles has a system called "auto-tagging" using the auto-tagging rule editor. Each time an article/file has the word "racism" I can use Tabbles to put it into "Racism" Tabble; a pop-up will allow the one-click tagging system in Tabbles. Without Tabbles, research would take much longer. You don't have to learn relational databases as Tabbles is intuitive. I cannot recommend Tabbles enough. I would be lost without it. If you are interested, you can find Tabbles here: http://tabbles.net/ ...
  7. Admin

    TABBLES 5

    I want to extend my thanks to Andrea at Tabbles: http://tabbles.net/quick-intro/ What is Tabbles, in a few words? Tabbles is a tagging software that allows to tag any kind of file, emails (in Outlook), and bookmarks. It helps you to tag and organize your files independently from folders and find them when you don’t remember where they are, but only what they are about. Tabbles allows you to combine tags with a few mouse clicks, immediately finding the file, regardlessly of what folder or disk it is stored on. It even tells you what drive you need to connect, in case the file is archived on a disconnected drive. A tabble is a both a tag and a virtual folder Tabbles are tags that you apply to files and other data; but they are also special folders, because they can be combined, intersected and subtracted from each other, to create dynamic combinations of files. You can put files in as many tabbles as you want, without duplicating them. No disk space will be wasted. The magic starts when you try to open the tabble and combine it with other tabbles, to find what you need in a natural way, without the need to know which directory or drive contains the files you need. You can also define powerful rules to tag files automatically. You can also define powerful rules to tag files automatically. Tags can be combined, allowing to find a file in many different paths The combine function allows you to find files and other documents by describing them the way you find more natural. Tabbles adapts to the way you think, allowing to find a file in many different paths. For example, you can reach the same file by clicking Pictures > John smith > vacations > beach or by clicking Year 2010 > Trip > India > John Smith > Mary Evans, even though that file only has a single physical path, like “Y:\archived\2010\Trip-to-india\Camera\BR0000223”. A physical path which you most likely do not remember! Add to all this that the drive containing the file is probably disconnected, and you would have to attach all your drives in sequence to find the file. In short, with Tabbles you get the power of a relational database and the usability of a pocket calculator! Share your tagging and collaborate In a corporate environment with many users and machines, users can share some or all of their tags, so that each user can find files based on tags applied by colleagues. Tabbles stores its tags into a Microsoft SQL Server databases, and allows for tag-sharing on local drives, shared drives as well as on cloud sync folder (like Dropbox, OneDrive etc.). The system administrator can manage users, sharing groups permissions and licenses via an Admin control panel.
  1. Load more activity
×