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  1. Stem Cells Have Promise for SLE Treatment Across Ethnicities, Proof-of-concept Study Shows FEBRUARY 6, 2019 BY MARISA WEXLER IN NEWS. Click Here to receive Lupus News via e-mail A new proof-of-concept study supports the use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to treat systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), showing that transplanting MSCs can control the disease in patients from different ethnicities. The study, “Therapeutic potential of allogeneic mesenchymal stromal cells transplantation for lupus nephritis,” was published in Lupus. MSCs are cells that are able to differentiate (transform) into certain other types of cells, including bone, muscle, and fat cells. These cells are thought to have potential as treatments for SLE because they can reduce bone loss and inflammation in mouse models. However, there is limited data about how well MSC therapy works in humans. There have been a few studies with promising results, but these have come almost entirely from centers in China, meaning the patients are share the same ethnic background. In this proof-of-concept study, MSC therapy was used for three patients in Spain. Two of the patients were male Spanish Caucasians; the third was a Bolivian female of indigenous descent. All patients had been diagnosed with SLE for more than a decade and, at the time of treatment, had flare-ups that were not being well-controlled with standard therapies. MSCs were taken from the bone marrows of healthy donors, purified, expanded, and then infused into patients intravenously at a dose of 1.5 million cells per kilogram of body weight — an average of 90 million cells per patient. The patients were followed for nine months. Researchers assessed markers of inflammation and immune activity, as well as markers of kidney function like the amount of protein in their urine. Kidneys are often targets of the body’s autoimmune attack in SLE, and damage to them can be a serious issue in this disease. The researchers also measured disease severity using the SLE Disease Activity Index 2000. All three patients responded to treatment with MSCs. Two had complete responses, with decreased inflammatory markers, signs of better kidney function, and lower disease score that were sustained over the entire nine-month follow-up period. The third was only deemed a partial response, but was still an improvement, and dosages of other medications could be reduced by 50% to 90% for all the patients. The researchers reported there were no adverse side effects or safety problems associated with the patients receiving the MSC therapy. There also was no evidence that the MSCs were being rejected by the body, which can be a concern for these types of therapies. “Our results confirm the successful results of MSC treatments in SLE patients performed in different ethnic groups and locations,” the researchers concluded in their paper, also noting that the findings support the prompt implementation of a Phase 2 clinical trial testing the approach in a larger group of patients. The trial (2017-000391-28), already approved by the Spanish Medicines Agency, will include 36 patients with lupus nephritis (a common kidney inflammation in SLE patients) and randomly assign them an infusion with MSCs or a placebo. The trial’s main objective is to determine if more patients respond to MSCs. Secondary measures include the time to response, duration of response, safety, and reductions in use of corticosteroids and immunosuppressants. https://lupusnewstoday.com/2019/02/06/study-stem-cells-promise-sle-treatment-across-ethnicities/?utm_source=LUP+NEws+E-mail+List&utm_campaign=1e70fc3e85-RSS_WEEKLY_EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_US&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_50dac6e56f-1e70fc3e85-71887989
  2. SLE Patients at Higher Risk for Some Blood Cancers, Study Says FEBRUARY 18, 2019 BY JOANA CARVALHO IN NEWS. Click Here to receive Lupus News via e-mail Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients have a higher risk for certain cancers — including cervical, thyroid, ovarian, and oral cancer, as well as lymphoma, multiple myeloma, and leukemia — than the general population, emphasizing the importance of cancer screening programs as part of SLE management. The findings of the study, “Systemic lupus erythematosus is a risk factor for cancer: a nationwide population-based study in Korea,” were published in Lupus. SLE, the most prevalent form of lupus, is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by behavioral and psychological symptoms including pain, fatigue, depression, and impaired cognition. Previous studies have suggested that SLE patients are more likely to be affected by certain types of cancers, including non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, lung, liver, and vaginal cancer. “However, some studies have found a decreased risk of some hormone-sensitive cancers, such as breast, ovarian, and endometrial cancer, in SLE patients. However, whether patients with SLE have increased or decreased risk of breast cancer remains unclear,” the researchers said. In this study, investigators set out to characterize the relationship between SLE and cancer in the entire Korean population. The nationwide, retrospective, cohort study involved 21,016 SLE patients and 105,080 age- and sex-matched controls without SLE. The cohort was selected from the Korean National Health Insurance Service (NHIS) database between 2008 and 2014. Over a follow-up period of seven years, 763 (3.36%) SLE patients and 2,667 (2.54%) controls developed cancer. The incidence risk of cancer was higher in SLE patients compared to controls (6.427 vs 4.466). Incidence risk refers to the chance of a disease happening over a defined period of time. After accounting for age and sex, SLE patients showed a 44% higher risk of developing cancer. No differences in cancer risk were found between female and male SLE patients. SLE patients at higher risk for cancer were younger (under 40) and male, being 12 and 29 times more likely of developing lymphoma than control subjects. Looking at different cancer types, researchers found that SLE patients were more likely to develop cervical, thryoid, ovarian, and oral cancer, as well as lymphoma, leukemia, and multiple myeloma than controls. On the other hand, no significant differences in the risk of stomach, colorectal, liver, pancreatic, lung, breast, prostate, biliary, laryngeal, renal, bladder, nerve, and skin cancer were found between SLE patients and controls. While the mechanisms leading to increased risk of cancer in SLE patients are yet to be fully understood, the findings highlight the need for cancer screening programs among this patient population. “In conclusion, SLE is an independent risk factor for malignancy, especially cervical, thyroid, ovarian, oral … as well as lymphoma, multiple myeloma, and leukemia. The importance of cancer screening programs should be emphasized in SLE patients,” the scientists concluded. https://lupusnewstoday.com/2019/02/18/sle-patients-may-be-at-higher-risk-of-developing-certain-types-of-cancer/?utm_source=LUP+NEws+E-mail+List&utm_campaign=1e70fc3e85-RSS_WEEKLY_EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_US&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_50dac6e56f-1e70fc3e85-71887989
  3. Congratulations and Many Thanks to Lady Gaga! To the entire world, Lady Gaga is a winner. But to the lupus community she’s a hero. Last night at the 2019 Grammy’s, she won an award for Best Pop Solo in honor of her aunt Joanne who lost her battle with lupus at 19. Afterwards she tweeted: Lady Gaga has shared the song’s significance on social media. “I have carried a deep grief in my heart over my family’s tragedy. The loss of Joanne affected my father so deeply that it affected me. When he cried, I cried. When he was angry, I was angry. When he was hurt, I hurt. Today I transform this grief to hope and healing. After 10 years with you I still get nervous before the Grammys, but I know I have an angel with me.” Hear about lupus research from Lady Gaga's dad And watch this video to hear directly from Lady Gaga’s dad, Joe Germanotta, about why he has honoured his sister by actively supporting the Lupus Research Alliance. As a member of our Board of Directors, Joe believes that the research funded by the Lupus Research Alliance is where hope begins. Where our funded research discoveries are breaking through to deliver better treatments and a cure!
  4. Lupus: 3 Things to Know Mark L. Fuerst Dec 3, 2018 Lupus Three new studies in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) reveal that a gut bacterium may be linked to autoimmune diseases, including SLE; pregnancy complications in women with lupus have decreased over the past 2 decades; and physical or emotional abuse in childhood raises the risk of lupus.1-3Scroll through the slides for the latest findings and their clinical implications. http://www.rheumatologynetwork.com/lupus/lupus-3-things-know
  5. lupusnewstoday.com/2019/01/18/rubella-immunity-lowers-vaccinated-lupus-adolescents/ Jose Marques Lopes, PhDJanuary 18, 2019 Vaccinated patients with highly active systemic lupus erythematosus seem to lose their immunity levels over time, a study in rubella-vaccinated adolescents suggests. The study, “Risk factors associated with accelerated rubella-IgG antibody loss in previously vaccinated, treatment-naïve juvenile Systemic Lupus Erythematosus patients: a prospective study,” was published in the journal Arthritis & Rheumatology. Patients with SLE are at risk for infections, including those that are preventable by vaccines, due to the alterations in their immune system and the immunosuppressive treatments they receive. SLE particularly affects women of childbearing age. Rubella infection during pregnancy is associated with severe neonatal complications, including miscarriage, congenital rubella syndrome, and neonatal death. As a result, knowing the immune status against rubella in at-risk SLE patients is important. Researchers from the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens in Greece looked to address this, focusing their study on previously vaccinated adolescents with juvenile SLE (jSLE). They also wanted to find potential factors affecting antibody levels. In total, the study included 21 newly diagnosed girls with jSLE, with a mean age of 11.6 years. All of them had had two doses of the live attenuated MMR — measles, mumps, and rubella — vaccine in early childhood. No patients had underlying immunodeficiency, a blood transfusion within the previous six months, or prior treatment with immunomodulatory therapies. Seroprotection — a positive, protective response to vaccination — and levels of rubella antibodies were determined at enrollment and at one and three years after treatment. Results revealed that while patients remained protected from rubella infection at all times, the amount of antibodies against the virus significantly decreased over time, from 39.1 IU/ml at diagnosis to 29.9 IU/mL at one year and 26.2 IU/mL at three years. No patients showed low total antibody levels or renal insufficiency. High SLE disease activity — assessed with the SLE disease activity index, or SLEDAI — and low levels of the complement protein C4 — a common SLE marker — were associated with lower rubella antibody concentrations at diagnosis and at 12 months. Findings further revealed that skin involvement and persistent lymphopenia and leukopenia — having abnormally low blood levels of lymphocytes or leukocytes (white blood cells), respectively — at one year directly correlated to lower rubella antibody concentrations. “In conclusion, high disease activity strongly correlated with accelerated antibody loss,” the investigators wrote, adding that lower antibody levels may be due to SLE, its activity, or medications. They also noted that although more studies are needed to assess long-term immunity induced by vaccinations in children with autoimmune diseases, “close monitoring of the immunization status against vaccine-preventable diseases in this group of patients is advised.” The team cautioned that the small number of patients precluded finding differences among the different treatment groups.
  6. Dietary Supplements and Homeopathy Are Not Tested for Safety and Effectiveness Posted by Kathleen Hoffman on Dec 17, 2018 in Blog | 0 comments On October 30, 2018, the FDA sent a letter to the American Botanical Pharmacy and “Dr.” Richard Schulze – whose “doctorate is in herbology”- stating, Yet on December 8, 2018, the website still had this question and answer posted. Type I diabetes is an autoimmune condition in which the body destroys the beta cells of the pancreas that produce insulin. Lifestyle changes and using supplements will not cure Type I diabetes. Although the company removed items from the FDA’s detailed list of violations, they still missed this and several other claims of cures with the use of their dietary supplement products. Use of Supplements and Homeopathy More than half of the US adult population consume dietary supplements. The dietary supplement industry today is a $35.9 billion a year market and is estimated to grow by 20 billion dollars in the next six years.3 Around six million people in the US use homeopathy, one million of them are children. Unfortunately, many people do not realize that these products are regulated as food. The Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act, passed in 1994, allows these products to be sold without testing for safety or effectiveness and without information on adverse effects or packaging that is child-resistant.4 Distrust of the pharmaceutical industry and an interest in taking control of one’s health are just a couple of the reasons people choose dietary supplements and homeopathy. Unfortunately, dietary supplements and homeopathy are being actively promoted on the Internet in lieu of regulated, mainstream treatments. Many of these supplements have serious drawbacks. Recent research found that 746 dietary supplement brands from between 2007 and 2016 contained active pharmaceutical drugs, like steroids.5 Teething tablets by Hyland’s Homeopathic were recently discovered to contained belladonna nightshade, a poisonous plant. Linked to deaths of babies last year, the FDA warned consumers not to use these products.6 Hepatotoxicity is a principle safety issue for as many as 60 herbal supplements. Green tea contains ECGC, an antioxidant that is toxic for liver cells. Green tea based herbal supplements containing other ingredients have been implicated in liver damage requiring liver transplant.7 It shouldn’t be surprising to learn that a 2015 study of emergency room visits in the US estimated that over 23,000 emergency department visits per year can be attributed to adverse events caused by dietary supplements. These visits resulted in an estimated 2,154 hospitalizations.8 It’s important to be careful and wary of what is advertised as supplements. Remembering that the FDA does not test these products for safety or effectiveness before they are sold to you. It is only when a problem arises and the FDA is notified, that warnings and recalls occur. Check out Meat Packers and Patent Medicines: Welcome to Life before the FDA References 1 https://www.fda.gov/ICECI/EnforcementActions/WarningLetters/ucm627164.htm 2 https://www.herbdoc.com/blog/is-diabetes-curablec.oup.com/jnci/article/110/1/121/4064136 3 https://www.statista.com/statistics/828481/total-dietary-supplements-market-size-in-the-us/ 4 https://ods.od.nih.gov/About/DSHEA_Wording.aspx 5 doi:10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2018.3337 6 https://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/ConsumerUpdates/ucm230762.htm 7 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpeds.2018.05.022 8 DOI: 10.1056/NEJMsa1504267 https://medivizor.com/blog/2018/12/17/dietary-supplements-and-homeopathy/?utm_campaign=website&utm_source=sendgrid.com&utm_medium=email
  7. Cannabinoids for RA: What Rheumatologists Need to Know Linda Peckel Nov 12, 2018 Studies indicate the benefits of treatment with cannabinoids for rheumatic diseases in general.1-3 In rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the target of cannabinoid therapy has been pain reduction. Clinical data do not currently support an indication for reduction of disease severity, although new studies continue to explore this potential. References: 1. Katz-Talmor D, Katz I, Porat-Katz BS, Shoenfeld Y. Cannabinoids for the treatment of rheumatic diseases - where do we stand? Nat Rev Rheumatol. 2018 Jun 8. doi: 10.1038/s41584-018-0025-5. [Epub ahead of print] 2. Gui H, Tong Q, Qu W, Mao CM, Dai SM. The endocannabinoid system and its therapeutic implications in rheumatoid arthritis. Int Immunopharmacol. 2015;26:86-91. 3. Richards BL, Whittle SL, Buchbinder R. Neuromodulators for pain management in rheumatoid arthritis (review). Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2012;1:CD008921. http://www.rheumatologynetwork.com/arthritis/cannabinoids-ra-what-rheumatologists-need-know?rememberme=1&elq_mid=4976&elq_cid=1830808
  8. Admin

    GDPR

    Your GDPR questions answered Individual Rights The right to be informed Invision Community has a built in privacy policy system that is presented to a new user, and existing users when it has been updated. What should your privacy policy contain? I personally like the look of SEQ Legal's framework which is available for free. This policy covers the important points such as which cookies are collected, how personal information is used and so on. There may be other services out there offering similar templates. Right to erasure I personally feel that everyone should listen to "A Little Respect" as it's not only a cracking tune, but also carries a wonderful message. The GDPR document however relates to the individuals right to be forgotten. Invision Community allows you to delete members. When deleting members, you can elect to remove their content too. There is an option to keep it as Guest content, thus removing the author as identifiable. It's worth using the 'keep' option after researching the user's posts to make sure they haven't posted personal information such as where they live, etc. Emailing and Consent Invision Community has the correct opt-in for bulk emails on registration that is not pre-checked. If the user checks this option, this is recorded with the member's history. Likewise, if they retract this permission, that action is also recorded. When you edit the terms and conditions or privacy policy, all users are required to read it again and opt-in again. Cookies A lot of GDPR anxiety seems to revolve around these tiny little text files your browser stores. If you read the GDPR document (and who doesn't love a little light reading) then you'll see that very little has actually changed with cookies. It extends current data protection guidance a little to ensure that you are transparent about which cookies you store. Invision Community has tools to create a floating cookie opt-in bar, and also a page showing which cookies are stored and why. This is the page that you'd edit to add any cookies your installation sets (if you have enabled Facebook's Pixel, or Google Analytics for example). Your GDPR Questions Now let's look at some questions that have been asked on our community and I'll do my best to provide some guidance that should help you make decisions on how to configure your Invision Community to suit your needs. Alan!! Is the soft opt-in cookie policy enough? What about the IP address stored in the session cookie? Great question. There's conflicting advise out there about this. The GDPR document states: The ICO states that session cookies stored for that session only (so they are deleted when the tab / window is closed) are OK as long as they are not used to profile users. This is re-enforced by EUROPA: My feeling is that GDPR isn't really out to stop you creating a functioning website, they are more interested in how you store and use this information. Thus, I feel that storing a session cookie with an IP address is OK. The user is told what is being stored and instructions are given if they want to delete them. Given the internet is very much driven by IP addresses, I fail to see how you can not collect an IP address in some form or another. They are collected in access logs deep in the server OS. Finally, there is a strong legitimate interest in creating a session cookie. It's part and parcel of the website's function and the cookie is not used in any 'bad' way. It just allows guests and members to retain preferences and update "last seen" times to help deliver content. Do I need to delete all the posts by a member if they ask me to? We have many large clients in the EU with really impressive and expensive legal teams and they are all unanimous in telling us that there is no requirement to delete content when deleting a user's personal information. The analogy often given is with email: once someone sends you an email you are not obligated to delete that. The same is true with content posted by a user: once they post that content it's no longer "owned" by them and is now out in public. Ultimately, the decision is yours but do not feel that you have to delete their content. This is not a GDPR requirement. What about members who haven't validated? They're technically not members but we're still holding their data! No problem. The system does delete un-validated users and incomplete users automatically for you. You can even set the time delay for deletion in the ACP. What about RECAPTCHA? I use this, and it technically collects some data! Just add that you use this service to your privacy policy, like so: I see many companies emailing out asking for members to opt back in for bulk mail, do I need to do this? Short answer: No. Since Invision Community 4.0, you can only ever bulk email users that have opted in for bulk emails. There's no way around it, so there's nothing to ask them to opt-in for. They've already done it. There is a tiny wrinkle in that pre 4.2.7, the opt-in was pre-checked as was the norm for most websites. Moving forward, GDPR asks for explicit consent, so this checkbox cannot be pre-ticked (and isn't in Invision Community 4.2.7 and later). However, the ICO is clear that if the email list has a legitimate interest, and was obtained with soft opt-in, then you don't need to ask again for permission. What about notifications? They send emails! Yes they do, but that's OK. A notification is only ever sent after a user chooses to follow an item. This falls under legitimate interest. There is also a clear way to stop receiving emails. The user can opt-in and opt-out of email as a notification device at their leisure. Do I need to stop blocking embeds and external images? No. The internet is based on cross-linking of things and sharing information. At a very fundamental level, it's going to be incredibly hard to prevent it from happening. Removing these engaging and enriching tools are only going to make your community suffer. There's no harm in adding a few lines in your privacy policy explaining that the site may feature videos from Vimeo and Youtube as part of user contributions but you do not need to be worried. As stated earlier, GDPR isn't about sucking the fun out of the internet, it's about being responsible and transparent. Phew. Hopefully you've got a better understanding about how Invision Community can assist your GDPR compliance efforts. The best bit of advice is to not panic. If you have any questions, we'd love to hear them. Drop us a line below. Edited May 12 by Matt GDPR updates for Invision Community 4.3.3 Unless you've been living under a rock, or forgot to opt-in to the memo, GDPR is just around the corner. Last week we wrote a blog answering your questions on becoming GDPR compliant with Invision Community. We took away a few good points from that discussion and have the following updates coming up for Invision Community 4.3.3 due early next week. Downloading Personal Data Invision Community already has a method of downloading member data via the member export feature that produces a CSV. However, we wanted Invision Community to be more helpful, so we've added a feature that downloads personal data (such as name, email address, known IP addresses, known devices, opt in details and customer data from Nexus if you're using that) in a handy XML format which is very portable and machine readable. You can access this feature via the ACP member view The download itself is in a standard XML format. A sample export Pruning IP Addresses While there is much debate about whether IP addresses are personal information or not, a good number of our customers requested a way to remove IP addresses from older content. There are legitimate reasons to store IP addresses for purchase transactions (so fraud can be detected), for security logs (to prevent hackers gaining access) and to prevent spammers registering. However, under the bullet point of not storing information for longer than is required, we have added this feature to remove IP addresses from posted content (reviews, comments, posts, personal messages, etc) after a threshold. The default is 'Never', so don't worry. Post upgrade you won't see IP addresses removed unless you enter a value. This new setting is under Posting Deleting Members Invision Community has always had a way to delete a member and retain their content under a "Guest" name. We've cleaned this up in 4.3.3. When you delete a member, but want to retain their content, you are offered an option to anonymise this. Choosing this option attributes all posted content to 'Guest' and removes any stored IP addresses. Deleting a member Privacy Policy We've added a neat little feature to automatically list third parties you use on your privacy policy. If you enable Google Analytics, or Facebook Pixel, etc, these are added for you. The new setting Finding Settings Easily To make life a little easier, we've added "GDPR" as a live search keyword for the ACP. Simply tap that into the large search bar and Invision Community will list the relevant settings you may want to change. These changes show our ongoing commitment to helping you with your GDPR compliance. We'll be watching how GDPR in practise unfolds next month and will continue to adapt where required.
  9. Today, is World Lupus Day! Join Us and tell your story!
  10. Admin

    Tabbles

    I have been using Tabbles since it started and seen how it has developed. Its developer, Andrea, is someone who takes customer support very seriously. Whenever I have had a query or report a bug, he responds quickly. In addition, he has been very generous and has donated Tabbles to help me in my research. I am an academic researcher, which means reading hundreds of articles for a project. It's easy to create a new project, or container/virtual folder for the project, but each article may have aspects which can be tagged separately. For example, I am beginning a new project on contemporary racism. I created a new Tabble called Racism, which I colour coded - just as I used to do when I used cards for my research at university. I have hundreds of articles, from other projects, which are suitable for this project. It's easy to drop these into this new Tabble, from completed projects. At the same time, I can tag them to remind me they were also part of another Tabble or project. Many of the articles or information can be combined & Tabbles allows me to view these by using the "plus" sign.Thus,I can open the Racism Tabble & open two or more files at the same time. This "combine" feature means I can group together certain articles. For example, I might have a folder, within the Racism Tabble, called 19th century. Within this, I might want to put certain articles relating to 19th century. I can open & "combine" this specific information, from the articles, on nationalism in Germany. I might have a paper that I recall is a PDF & I can click on "New extension-tabble" because Tabbles automatically notes the extension of the file and locate the PDF. As I use the web for my research, Tabbles has a feature for the browser. I predominantly use Chrome and this means I can tag these articles for future reference. Every time I save an article, Tabbles lets me "tag" it via a pop-up my desktop.I can even create another Tabble or virtual folder, if necessary. As I research on the web, I can also use Tabbles to store its contents via tagging. One of the best features is to tag a file/article based, for example, on its "name". For this, Tabbles has a system called "auto-tagging" using the auto-tagging rule editor. Each time an article/file has the word "racism" I can use Tabbles to put it into "Racism" Tabble; a pop-up will allow the one-click tagging system in Tabbles. Without Tabbles, research would take much longer. You don't have to learn relational databases as Tabbles is intuitive. I cannot recommend Tabbles enough. I would be lost without it. If you are interested, you can find Tabbles here: http://tabbles.net/ ...
  11. Admin

    TABBLES 5

    I want to extend my thanks to Andrea at Tabbles: http://tabbles.net/quick-intro/ What is Tabbles, in a few words? Tabbles is a tagging software that allows to tag any kind of file, emails (in Outlook), and bookmarks. It helps you to tag and organize your files independently from folders and find them when you don’t remember where they are, but only what they are about. Tabbles allows you to combine tags with a few mouse clicks, immediately finding the file, regardlessly of what folder or disk it is stored on. It even tells you what drive you need to connect, in case the file is archived on a disconnected drive. A tabble is a both a tag and a virtual folder Tabbles are tags that you apply to files and other data; but they are also special folders, because they can be combined, intersected and subtracted from each other, to create dynamic combinations of files. You can put files in as many tabbles as you want, without duplicating them. No disk space will be wasted. The magic starts when you try to open the tabble and combine it with other tabbles, to find what you need in a natural way, without the need to know which directory or drive contains the files you need. You can also define powerful rules to tag files automatically. You can also define powerful rules to tag files automatically. Tags can be combined, allowing to find a file in many different paths The combine function allows you to find files and other documents by describing them the way you find more natural. Tabbles adapts to the way you think, allowing to find a file in many different paths. For example, you can reach the same file by clicking Pictures > John smith > vacations > beach or by clicking Year 2010 > Trip > India > John Smith > Mary Evans, even though that file only has a single physical path, like “Y:\archived\2010\Trip-to-india\Camera\BR0000223”. A physical path which you most likely do not remember! Add to all this that the drive containing the file is probably disconnected, and you would have to attach all your drives in sequence to find the file. In short, with Tabbles you get the power of a relational database and the usability of a pocket calculator! Share your tagging and collaborate In a corporate environment with many users and machines, users can share some or all of their tags, so that each user can find files based on tags applied by colleagues. Tabbles stores its tags into a Microsoft SQL Server databases, and allows for tag-sharing on local drives, shared drives as well as on cloud sync folder (like Dropbox, OneDrive etc.). The system administrator can manage users, sharing groups permissions and licenses via an Admin control panel.
  12. Invision Community 4.3 We are happy to announce the new Invision Community 4.3 is nearly available! Here is the list of what's new and we will follow up with individual blog entries going into detail about each new feature every couple days over the next few weeks. There will be a public preview in late January and we should go to public beta soon after that. Keep an eye on our blog for updates! Some highlights in Invision Community 4.3 include... Improved Search We now support Elasticsearch for scalable and accurate searching that MySQL alone cannot provided. There are also enhancements to the overall search interfaces based on your feedback. Emoji Express yourself with native emoji support in all editors. You can also keep your custom emoticons as you have now. Member Management The AdminCP interface to manage your members is all new allowing you easier control and management of your membership. Automatic Community Moderation You as the administrator set up rules to define how many unique member reports a piece of content needs to receive before it's automatically hidden from view and moderators notified. Clubs The new Clubs feature has been a huge hit with Invision Community users and we are expanding it to include invite-only options, notifications, exposure on the main community pages, paid memberships, and more. Custom Email Footers Your community generates a lot of email and you can now include dynamic content in the footer to help drive engagement and content discovery. New Gallery Interface We have reworked our Gallery system with a simplified upload process and more streamlined image viewing. The full list follows. Enjoy! Content Discovery We now support Elasticsearch which is a search utility that allows for much faster and more reliable searching. The REST API now supports search functions. Both MySQL and Elasticsearch have new settings for the admin to use to set search-defaults and default content weighting to better customize search logic to your community. Visitors can now search for Content Pages and Commerce Products. When entering a search term, members now see a more clear interface so they know what areas they are searching in and the method of search. Member Engagement Commerce can now send a customizable account welcome email after checkout. You can whitelist emails in the spam service to stop false-positives. REST API has many enhancements to mange members. Ability to join any OAuth service for login management. Invision Community can now be an OAuth endpoint. Wordpress OAuth login method built in. Support for Google's Invisible ReCaptcha. Groups can be excluded from Leaderboard (such as admins or bot groups). All emails generated by Invision Community can now contain admin-defined extra promotional text in the footer such as recent topics, Our Picks, and more. Admins can now define the order of Complete Your Profile to better control user experience. Clubs Option to make a Club visible but invite-only Admins can set an option so any Club a member is part of will also show in the parent application. So if you are in a Club that has a Gallery tab then those image will show both in the Club and in the main Gallery section of the community. Club members can now follow an entire Club rather than just each content section. There is a new option on the Club directory page for a list view which is useful for communities with many Clubs. If you have Commerce you can now enable paid memberships to Clubs. Admins can set limits on number of Clubs per group. If a group has delete permission in their Club, they can now delete empty containers as well. Members can ignore invitations. Moderation and Administration Unrestricted moderator or administrator permission sets in the AdminCP are visually flagged. This prevents administrator confusion when they cannot do something as they will be able to quickly see if their account has restrictions. You can choose to be notified with a new Club is created. Moderators can now reply to any content item with a hidden reply. Download screenshot/watermarks can now be rebuilt if you change settings. Support for Facebook Pixel to easily track visitors. Moderators can now delete Gallery albums. Automatic moderation tools with rules to define when content should auto-hide based on user reports. Totally new member management view in AdminCP. More areas are mass-selectable like comments and AdminCP functions for easier management. New Features Commerce now has full Stripe support including fraud tools, Apple Pay, and other Stripe features. Commerce packages can now have various custom email events configured (expiring soon, purchased, expired). Full Emojii support in the editor. Setting so when someone is typing in an editor, other members will see a "Member X is typing..." status in the editor view. Complete overhaul of the Gallery upload and image views. Announcements system overhaul. Now global on all pages (not via widget) and new modes including dismissible announcements and top-header floating bar option. Many new reports on traffic and engagement in the AdminCP. Blog has new view modes to offer options for a traditional site blog or a community multi-member blog platform. The content-starter can now leave one reply to Reviews on their item. Commerce now makes it much easier to do basic account-subscriptions when there is no product attached. Useful Improvements Forums has a new widget where you can filter by tags. If tags are not required, the tag input box now indicates this so the member knows they do not have to put in tags. Member cover photos can now be clicked to see the full image. Any item with a poll now has a symbol on the list view. Twitch.tv embed support. You can now update/overwrite media in the Pages Media Manager. Mapbox as an additional map provider to Google Maps. Technical Changes Direct support for Sparkpost has been removed. Anyone currently using Sparkpost will automatically have their settings converted to the Sparkpost SMTP mode so your email will still work. Your cache engines (like Redis) will be checked on upgrade and in the support tool to ensure they are reachable. Third-party applications will now be visually labeled to distinguish them from Invision Community official applications. The queued tasks list in the AdminCP is now collapsed by default as queued tasks are not something people need to pay much attention to during normal operations. When upgrading from version 3 series you must convert your database to UTF8 and the system saves your original data in tables prefixed with orig. The AdminCP now alerts you these are still present and allows you to remove them to reclaim storage space. On new installs there are now reasonable defaults for upload limits to keep people from eating up storage space. Categories in all apps (forums, gallery albums, databases, etc.) no longer allow HTML in their titles. This has been a concern both in terms of security and usability so we were forced to restrict it. Large improvements to the Redis cache engine including use for sessions. The login with HTTPS option has been removed and those who were using it will be given instructions to convert their entire community to HTTPS. Images loaded through the proxy system now honor image limits for normal uploads.
  13. Sex Differences in Lupus Mortality Mariah Zebrowski Leach, JD, MS Monday, December 4, 2017 Lupus A comprehensive US population-based study identified an average 22-year and 12-year deficit in life expectancy among females and males with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), respectively, compared with the general population. Background In the United States, SLE is a source of significantly decreased life expectancy. While marked differences have been observed between the sexes in terms of the incidence, prevalence, and clinical manifestations of SLE, this area is still poorly understood. Falasinnu and colleagues1 at Stanford School of Medicine identified sex-based differences in the causes of death among SLE decedents in the United States and recognized clinically relevant comorbidities that may warrant careful consideration in patients’ clinical management. The study This study examined SLE-related deaths using the 2014 National Center for Health Statistics multiple cause of death (MCOD) database, a population-based electronic medical recording of all death certificates issued in the United States. The analysis considered not only the number of death certificates listing SLE as the underlying cause of death, but also those listing SLE in general. Demographic information considered included age, race/ethnicity, sex, educational attainment, foreign-born status, marital status, and pregnancy status. SLE decedents were compared with non-SLE decedents in the general population belonging to the same age group. The findings In 2014, there were 2,660,497 deaths in the United States, of which 2036 (0.1%) listed SLE among the causes of death. Approximately 86.2% of SLE deaths occurred among females, with a median age at death of 59 years and the highest proportion of deaths occurring between 45 and 64 years of age. In comparison, the overall median age at death for females in the general population was 81 years, and the majority of deaths occurred among females over 65 years of age. Black females experienced the greatest burden of SLE mortality. Approximately 32% of all female SLE decedents were black, compared with only 11% of non–SLE-related deaths in the general population. Female decedents with SLE had a slightly higher proportion of foreign-born individuals than the general population, but there were no other significant demographic differences. The most frequently listed comorbidities among female decedents with SLE were septicemia (4.32%) and hypertension (3.04%). Among male decedents with SLE, the median age at death was 61 years, compared with 73 years in the general population. Of male decedents with SLE, 23.5% were black, compared with only 12% in the general population. The age-standardized mortality was highest among American Indian males. There were no other demographic differences related to SLE among male decedents. The most frequently listed comorbidities among male decedents with SLE were heart disease (3.70%) and diabetes mellitus with complications (3.61%). Implications for physicians and future research This study offers an opportunity to better describe the association between SLE and related comorbidities in the context of mortality, although the MCOD data have a number of limitations. Inaccuracy on death certificates can lead to the underestimation of the SLE mortality burden, and researchers were unable to differentiate between causes of death that were related to the natural age process, disease activity, and drug therapy. Still, the MCOD data provide a comprehensive understanding of the population-based burden of SLE mortality. While female SLE patients tend to have more frequent disease exacerbations, male patients appear to have significantly greater multisystemic damage accrual and disease severity. Greater disease severity among male SLE patients may be related to under diagnosis due to selective attention given to females by physicians during clinical decision-making. This potential for gender bias needs to be carefully considered. Racial minorities generally have a disproportionately higher burden of mortality. The scope and degree of these differences in SLE are particularly pronounced, with mortality rates among black females nearly four times as high as those in white females. “Our findings reinforce the urgent need for interventions that reduce morbidity and mortality in patients with SLE to improve health outcomes and ultimately reduce health disparities,” the researchers write. They note that novel translational research programs are currently underway to attempt to address these disparities. Clinically relevant comorbidities also need to be considered more carefully in the course of patients’ clinical management and the natural history of SLE. This study revealed future targets for the investigation of sex-based differences and directions for epidemiological research. “A comprehensive understanding of causes of death and the related comorbidities can improve clinical diagnostic and therapeutic strategies, impact survival outcomes in patients living with SLE, and enhance population-based disease surveillance estimates,” the researchers conclude. References: 1. Falasinnu T, Chaichian Y, Simard JF. Impact of sex on systemic lupus erythematosus-related causes of premature mortality in the United States. J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2017;26:1214-1221. doi: 10.1089/jwh.2017.6334.
  14. Environmental Factors Tied to Lupus Gregory M. Weiss, M.D. Tuesday, December 5, 2017 Lupus Key points • Ultraviolet light may cause flare-ups in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). • The chemicals found in cigarette smoke can worsen the symptoms of SLE. • Estrogen analogues such as oral contraceptives and bisphenol A (BPA), a substance used to make plastic bottles, may increase the risk of SLE. Background SLE affects women and African Americans disproportionately. Dr. Gaurav Gulati at the University of Cincinnati in Ohio points out that even though we have treatments for lupus, a complete understanding of its etiology and progression is lacking. Although genetics clearly plays a role in SLE, it appears that environmental factors may act as triggers in those who are susceptible. Dr. Gulati conducted a review of the literature related to SLE and environmental versus genetic factors; he presented his findings recently in Seminars in Arthritis and Rheumatism. The study A systematic review was conducted that looked at over 100 studies focused on SLE. The results • A triad of factors was found in one study that linked a patient’s genetics, how the patient’s DNA changes over time, and exposure to environmental factors to the development and course of SLE. • Twin studies reveal only a 24% concordance of SLE in identical siblings; this points to a conclusion that a combination of genetic predisposition and environmental factors is involved in the development of lupus. • Heavy metals and other trace elements may be triggers for SLE; uranium, lead, and cadmium are linked to autoimmunity. • Elements such as mercury, nickel, and gold have been implicated in delayed hypersensitivity and inflammation, and a higher rate of lupus has been noted among dental workers. • An increase in SLE has been found in women who take oral contraceptives and in those exposed to xenoestrogens such as BPA, a chemical found in plastics. Implications for physicians • Physicians and particularly rheumatologists who treat patients with SLE should vigorously encourage positive lifestyle modifications such as smoking cessation and avoidance of direct sunlight. • Patients with SLE should be advised to always wear sunscreen. • Rheumatologists should provide regular surveillance to their patients with SLE as changes in disease activity and treatment are warranted. References: Gulati G, Brunner HI. Environmental triggers in systemic lupus erythematosus. Semin Arthritis Rheum. 2017 Oct 5. pii: S0049-0172(17)30469-9. doi: 10.1016/j.semarthrit.2017.10.001. [Epub ahead of print]
  15. Sex Differences in Lupus Mortality Mariah Zebrowski Leach, JD, MS Monday, December 4, 2017 A comprehensive US population-based study identified an average 22-year and 12-year deficit in life expectancy among females and males with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), respectively, compared with the general population. Background In the United States, SLE is a source of significantly decreased life expectancy. While marked differences have been observed between the sexes in terms of the incidence, prevalence, and clinical manifestations of SLE, this area is still poorly understood. Falasinnu and colleagues1 at Stanford School of Medicine identified sex-based differences in the causes of death among SLE decedents in the United States and recognized clinically relevant comorbidities that may warrant careful consideration in patients’ clinical management. The study This study examined SLE-related deaths using the 2014 National Center for Health Statistics multiple cause of death (MCOD) database, a population-based electronic medical recording of all death certificates issued in the United States. The analysis considered not only the number of death certificates listing SLE as the underlying cause of death, but also those listing SLE in general. Demographic information considered included age, race/ethnicity, sex, educational attainment, foreign-born status, marital status, and pregnancy status. SLE decedents were compared with non-SLE decedents in the general population belonging to the same age group. The findings In 2014, there were 2,660,497 deaths in the United States, of which 2036 (0.1%) listed SLE among the causes of death. Approximately 86.2% of SLE deaths occurred among females, with a median age at death of 59 years and the highest proportion of deaths occurring between 45 and 64 years of age. In comparison, the overall median age at death for females in the general population was 81 years, and the majority of deaths occurred among females over 65 years of age. Black females experienced the greatest burden of SLE mortality. Approximately 32% of all female SLE decedents were black, compared with only 11% of non–SLE-related deaths in the general population. Female decedents with SLE had a slightly higher proportion of foreign-born individuals than the general population, but there were no other significant demographic differences. The most frequently listed comorbidities among female decedents with SLE were septicemia (4.32%) and hypertension (3.04%). Among male decedents with SLE, the median age at death was 61 years, compared with 73 years in the general population. Of male decedents with SLE, 23.5% were black, compared with only 12% in the general population. The age-standardized mortality was highest among American Indian males. There were no other demographic differences related to SLE among male decedents. The most frequently listed comorbidities among male decedents with SLE were heart disease (3.70%) and diabetes mellitus with complications (3.61%). Implications for physicians and future research This study offers an opportunity to better describe the association between SLE and related comorbidities in the context of mortality, although the MCOD data have a number of limitations. Inaccuracy on death certificates can lead to the underestimation of the SLE mortality burden, and researchers were unable to differentiate between causes of death that were related to the natural age process, disease activity, and drug therapy. Still, the MCOD data provide a comprehensive understanding of the population-based burden of SLE mortality. While female SLE patients tend to have more frequent disease exacerbations, male patients appear to have significantly greater multisystemic damage accrual and disease severity. Greater disease severity among male SLE patients may be related to under diagnosis due to selective attention given to females by physicians during clinical decision-making. This potential for gender bias needs to be carefully considered. Racial minorities generally have a disproportionately higher burden of mortality. The scope and degree of these differences in SLE are particularly pronounced, with mortality rates among black females nearly four times as high as those in white females. “Our findings reinforce the urgent need for interventions that reduce morbidity and mortality in patients with SLE to improve health outcomes and ultimately reduce health disparities,” the researchers write. They note that novel translational research programs are currently underway to attempt to address these disparities. Clinically relevant comorbidities also need to be considered more carefully in the course of patients’ clinical management and the natural history of SLE. This study revealed future targets for the investigation of sex-based differences and directions for epidemiological research. “A comprehensive understanding of causes of death and the related comorbidities can improve clinical diagnostic and therapeutic strategies, impact survival outcomes in patients living with SLE, and enhance population-based disease surveillance estimates,” the researchers conclude. References: 1. Falasinnu T, Chaichian Y, Simard JF. Impact of sex on systemic lupus erythematosus-related causes of premature mortality in the United States. J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2017;26:1214-1221. doi: 10.1089/jwh.2017.6334.
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